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how to make marshmallow snowmen place holders

marshmallow snowman jar Place holder, decoration, however you use them… aren’t these plastic spoon snowmen-in-a-pot from Crafts by Amanda the cutest thing in the universe? Cuter than puppies, baby pandas and even this. So I took the snowman challenge and make my own cute snowmen-in-a-pot, marshmallow style. marshmallow snowman jar Attach a name and you have a place holder for your Christmas table. (Oooh, use red and green candies in the jar for that, yes?) Or Hannukah table. Or winter party table. Or, pop a bunch of them on the dessert table at any of those parties. Or, wrap the whole lot in a cellophane bag with ribbon, attach a gift card and you have an adorable gift to give. I ended up using mini marshmallows for my jar filling because it was the cheapest, but you could use gum balls, gum drops, Whoppers, whatever you want. marshmallow snowman jar marshmallow snowman jar

marshmallow snowmen place holders

you will need:* marshmallows 6-inch lollipop sticks edible writers (black, orange and pink) craft felt scissors small mason jars (8-ounce) candy to fill the jars white card stock and a brown and black markers (optional) *Find the lollipop sticks, felt and jars in the craft store. You may also find jars in the supermarket or hardware stores. Find edible writers in the craft store, online or specialty stores. My favorite brand is Americolor Gourmet Writers. Find lots of information on edible writers HERE. marshmallow snowman jar   step one: decorate the snowmen Skewer the marshmallows with the lollipop sticks and draw the snowman faces. First, use the black to draw the eyes. Then make an orange triangle for the nose. Make two pink dots for the cheeks and use the black to draw the mouth. snowman marshmallow   step two: add the scarf Cut srips of felt 7-inches by 3/4-inch. Snip each end to make fringe. Tie the scarf tightly under the marshmallow. snowman marshmallow   step three: arrange your snowman Pour candies into the jars and insert the snowman. If you like, add a place card. Cut a strip of cardstock, draw brown stick hands and write the name. Adhere to the stick with a small piece of tape. snowman jar   TIPS: Keep the marshmallows in a sealed container until right before serving to preserve freshness (then pop them in the jars). To give as a gift, insert the jar and marshmallow into a cellophane bag and tie at the top with ribbon. marshmallow snowman jar   SUPPLIES:

 

Feel free to share (nicely)! While my blog's photographs and text are protected by copyright, I do allow (and encourage) you to share ONE photograph with credit to "the decorated cookie" and link to this blog post. PLEASE don't reprint any part of the blog post and PLEASE don't post a photo without credit. Thank you!

GIVEAWAY: The Biscoff Cookie and Spread Cookbook (and some awesome granola)

The-Biscoff-Cookie-and-Spread-Cookbook-by-Katrina-Bahl-2

COOKIE BUTTER!! I feel it’s important to open that way when describing this spread made not from nuts (joy to those with allergies!) but from cookies. And I’m happy to say my friend Katrina, of In Katrina’s Kitchen, has helped spark this awesome trend of baking with cookie butter when she made the switch after discovering her son was allergic to peanuts. AND she has a book out now. It’s called The Biscoff Cookie and Spread Cookbook, published in November by Countryman Press. AND, you can win a copy. (Scroll to the end for the GIVEAWAY!)

 

Biscoff-Buckeye-Truffles

 

Want to know what you can do with cookie butter? (Aside from eat it right from the jar when you sneak into the kitchen at midnight?) You can make breakfast, cookies, bars and brownies, cakes and cupcakes, bread and muffins, candies, and frosting and fillings.  Buckeye truffles, as seen above, Donut Holes, Pudding Cookies, Gooey Caramel Brownies, Tiramisu, Custard Cake, Scones, Soft Pretzel Nuggets, Toffee, Fudge … I could go on, you know. I’m stunned by the number of recipes in this book.

 

Biscoff-Granola

 

I chose to make the very first recipe in the book. Granola, or, more specifically and accurate in each adjective, “Easy Biscoff Granola.” The image above is from the book. The image below is mine. The granola is all mine. (Except my kid ate some, ugh.) And I want this granola every morning for the rest of my life. I mixed this batch with some almonds and dried apricots. Now, isn’t that the perfect snack while you’re waiting for your Thanksgiving dinner?

biscoff granola

 

Easy Biscoff Granola, straight from the pages of The Biscoff Cookie and Spread Cookbook, by Katrina Bahl.

1/2 cup Creamy or Crunchy Biscoff Spread
1/4 cup honey
3 tablespoons brown sugar
2 cups old-fashioned oats
Cinnamon sugar (1 teaspoon ground cinnamon + 3 tablespoons granulated sugar), optional
Dried fruits, chocolate chips, nuts, or seeds, optional

Preheat oven to 325º F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a nonstick silicone baking mat. Don’t skip this step–granola may stick to the bottom of your baking sheet and burn.

Microwave Biscoff Spread, honey, and brown sugar in a microwave-safe bowl for 30-60 seconds, or until creamy. Alternately, warm over medium-low heat on the stovetop, stirring constantly.

Pour wet ingredients over the oats in a large bowl. Mix and spread onto prepared baking sheet. Bake for 10 minutes; stir. Bake for another 8-10 minutes.

Sprinkle with cinnamon sugar when still warm if desired. Make a trail mix by adding your favorite mix-ins when the granola is completely cooled: raisins, dried cranberries, chopped Biscoff cookies, chocolate chips, and/or seeds.

Let cool completely before storing in an airtight container.

 

The-Biscoff-Cookie-and-Spread-Cookbook-by-Katrina-Bahl-2

 

GIVEAWAY

For a chance to win a copy of The Biscoff Cookie and Spread Cookbook,

leave a comment here before Sunday November 23, 2014, midnight EST.

Winner will be drawn randomly and has 48 hours to respond before another winner is drawn.

Ships from publisher to US addresses only.

 

Feel free to share (nicely)! While my blog's photographs and text are protected by copyright, I do allow (and encourage) you to share ONE photograph with credit to "the decorated cookie" and link to this blog post. PLEASE don't reprint any part of the blog post and PLEASE don't post a photo without credit. Thank you!

chocolate and candy turkey pops for Thanksgiving

turkey pops

I hope you can tell these are supposed to be turkeys. I omitted some of the finer details that compose the bird for the sake of easy decorating. I quizzed my 7 year old, and she figured it out. Plus, if you serve these at or around Thanksgiving, I’m pretty sure folks will get it. If not, you need smarter friends. Just sayin’.

Oh my how far we’ve come from the first Thanksgiving when now turkeys come in candy on sticks.

turkey pops

 

chocolate turkey pops

you will need:*

chocolate candy melts
disposable decorating bags
lollipop sticks
candy eyes
M and Ms
Mike and Ike’s candy

*Find the candy melts, disposable decorating bags, lollipop sticks and candy eyes in the craft store.

turkey pops

 

what to do: Line a baking tray with wax paper or parchment paper and set aside. Have ready red, orange and yellow M and Ms for the feathers, candy eyes, and yellow and red Mike and Ike’s.

turkey pops

Place 1/2 to 3/4 cup of chocolate melts in a disposable decorating bag. Melt in the microwave at 70 percent power for 90 seconds. Massage and continue to microwave in 15 second intervals just until melted.

 

turkey pops

 

Snip 1/4 inch from the tip of the decorating bag. Work with one pop at a time. Pipe a dot on the baking tray. Rest a lollipop stick on top. Then pipe a circle about 1 1/2 inches across on top of the dot. Immediately place two candy eyes, the beak, the wattle and three M and Ms for the feathers on the chocolate circle. Fill the tray and let set about an hour.

turkey pops

 

SUPPLIES:

Feel free to share (nicely)! While my blog's photographs and text are protected by copyright, I do allow (and encourage) you to share ONE photograph with credit to "the decorated cookie" and link to this blog post. PLEASE don't reprint any part of the blog post and PLEASE don't post a photo without credit. Thank you!

from the archives: Thanksgiving plan from beginning to end

I always cook Thanksgiving, because I love the challenge. Well, more like because I don’t feel like traveling anywhere. Every year I get better at it, which makes sense because I started pretty low on the “Thanksgiving cooking ability” scale. To organize myself last year, since I had a lot more guests than I’ll have this year (I need a year of rest), I created a pretty comprehensive blog post. It includes links to recipes, decorations, activities, all that jazz. And last year I incorporated most of this stuff and it all worked really well.

If I get my act together, I’ll come up with a revised plan for this year. But in the meantime, here’s some help from someone struggling to nail down this whole “hosting Thanksgiving” thing.

Find all 24 ideas to plan Thanksgiving HERE.

Thanksgiving menu

Feel free to share (nicely)! While my blog's photographs and text are protected by copyright, I do allow (and encourage) you to share ONE photograph with credit to "the decorated cookie" and link to this blog post. PLEASE don't reprint any part of the blog post and PLEASE don't post a photo without credit. Thank you!

Wednesday Links: Fun food and craft finds

veteransday_picture

My 7 year old daughter made this beautiful drawing for her dad (an army reservist who has paid a visit to Iraq) in honor of Veterans Day. Did you get a chance to honor the veterans in your life? I hope so.

 

your Wednesday Links (you can follow all of the links at Pinterest):

clever way to dress up beer for Christmas

a great round-up of DIY wreaths from repurposed items

Thanksgiving kids table! love the crayon turkeys

please, please don’t buy an ugly Christmas sweater… make one

make gingerbread popcorn

awesome handmade gift: dress-up peg dolls

Feel free to share (nicely)! While my blog's photographs and text are protected by copyright, I do allow (and encourage) you to share ONE photograph with credit to "the decorated cookie" and link to this blog post. PLEASE don't reprint any part of the blog post and PLEASE don't post a photo without credit. Thank you!